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First Time Home Buyer

First Time Home Buyer

What to expect

Pre-Qualification

Pr-qualification starts the loan process. Once a lender has gathered information about a borrower’s income and debts, a determination can be made as to how much the borrower can pay for a house. Since different loan programs can cause different valuations a borrower should get per-qualified for each loan type the borrower may qualify for.

In attempting to approve home buyers for the type and amount of mortgage they want, mortgage companies look at two key factors. First, the borrower’s ability to repay the loan and, second, the borrower’s willingness to repay the loan.

Ability to repay the mortgage is verified by your current employment and total income. Generally speaking, mortgage companies prefer for you to have been employed at the same place for at least two years, or at least be in the same line of work for a few years.

The borrower’s willingness to repay is determined by examining how the property will be used. For instance, will you be living there or just renting it out? Willingness is also closely related to how you have fulfilled previous financial commitments, thus the emphasis on the Credit Report and/or your rental payment history.

It is important to remember that there are no rules carved in stone. Each applicant is handled on a case-by-case basis. So even if you come up a little short in one area, your stronger point could make up for the weak one. Mortgage companies could not stay in business if they did not generate loan business, so it is in everyone’s best interest to see that you qualify.

 

The Application

The application is the next step of the loan process. With the aid of a mortgage professional, the borrower completes the application and provides all Requested Documentation. A loan application is not considered complete until you have given us at least the following information: (1) Your name, (2) Your income, (3) Your Social Security number (and authorization to check your credit), (4) The address of the home you plan to purchase or refinance, (5) An estimate of the home’s value and (6) The loan amount you want to borrow.

 

The Loan Estimate

A Loan Estimate is a three-page form that you receive after applying for a mortgage. The Loan Estimate tells you important details about the loan you have requested. We will deliver this to you within 3 days of your fully completed loan application. The Loan Estimate provides you with important information, including the estimated interest rate, monthly payment, and total closing costs for the loan. The Loan Estimate also gives you information about the estimated costs of taxes and insurance, and how the interest rate and payments may change in the future.

 

Processing

Once the application has been submitted, the processing of the mortgage begins. The Processor orders the Credit Report, Appraisal and Title Report. The information on the application, such as bank deposits and payment histories, are then verified. Any derogatory credit, such as late payments, collections and/or judgments require a written explanation. The processor examines the Appraisal and Title Report checking for property issues that may require further investigation. The entire mortgage package is then put together for submission to the lender.

 

Required Documents

Once you have completed the loan application, accepted the loan estimate and indicated your intent to proceed we will request documents from you in order to obtain your loan approval. The following statements are not a complete list of what will be needed but are intended to give you some idea of what we will need from you.

Past two-years W-2s

  • One month of pay-stubs
  • Past two-years tax returns.
  • If you own rental property you will need to provide Rental Agreements and the past two-years’ tax returns.
  • If you wish to speed up the approval process, you should also provide the past three months’ bank, stock and mutual fund account statements. Provide the most recent copies of any stock brokerage or IRA/401k accounts that you might have.

 
Appraisal Basics

An appraisal of real estate is the valuation of the rights of ownership. The appraiser must define the rights to be appraised. The appraiser does not create value; the appraiser interprets the market to arrive at a value estimate. As the appraiser compiles data pertinent to a report, consideration must be given to the site and amenities as well as the physical condition of the property. Considerable research and collection of data must be completed prior to the appraiser arriving at a final opinion of value.

 

Underwriting

Once the processor has put together a complete package with all verifications and documentation, the file is sent to the lender. The underwriter is responsible for determining whether the package is deemed an acceptable loan. If more information is needed, the loan is put into “suspense” and the borrower is contacted to supply more information and/or documentation. If the loan is acceptable as submitted, the loan is put into an “approved” status.

 

Closing Disclosure

The Closing Disclosure is a five-page form that provides final details about the mortgage loan you have selected. It includes the loan terms, your projected monthly payments, and how much you will pay in fees and other costs to get your mortgage (closing costs).

We are required by law to give you the Closing Disclosure at least three business days before you close on your mortgage loan. This three-day window allows you time to compare your final terms and costs to those estimated in the Loan Estimate that you previously received from us. The three days also gives you time to ask us any questions before you go to the closing table.

 

Closing

Once the loan is approved, the file is transferred to the closing and funding department. The funding department notifies the broker and closing attorney of the approval and verifies broker and closing fees. The closing attorney then schedules a time for the borrower to sign the loan documentation.

At the closing the borrower should:

  • Bring a cashier’s check for your down payment and closing costs if required. Personal checks are normally not accepted and if they are they will delay the closing until the check clears your bank.
  • Review the final loan documents. Make sure that the interest rate and loan terms are what you agreed upon. Also, verify that the names and address on the loan documents are accurate.
  • Sign the loan documents.
  • Bring identification and proof of insurance.

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